Silva-Corvalán Bilingual Corpus


Carmen Silva-Corvalán
Spanish & Portugese and Linguistics
University of Southern California

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Participants: 8
Type of Study: interview / naturalistic
Location: USA
Media type: audio
DOI: doi:10.21415/T5WS36

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Citation information

Four papers based on analyses of the data obtained have been written (one, Silva-Corvalán's, has been presented at an International Conference): Barrientos on lexical comprehension; Martín on case marking and sentence structure; Van der Vlugt on word order; and Silva-Corvalán on a comparison of the level of development of verb morphology with the level of lexical comprehension and production (see enclosures).

The articles listed above can be found in the following volume:

These data are made available here courtesy of the USC Libraries:

In accordance with TalkBank rules, any use of data from this corpus must be accompanied by at least one of the above references.

Project Description

For each of our eight subjects, we have obtained the following types of data: two tape-recorded sessions of approximately 30 minutes each between the child subject and a female research assistant, one consisting of naturalistic, spontaneous conversation, the other of role-play with puppets; in the third session the child produced a connected narrative based on a picturebook and answered a number of specific questions about the story. The four bilingual children were interviewed once in Spanish and once in English. During the second round of interviews (May-June 1989), we obtained approximately 30 minutes of naturalistic, spontaneous conversation from each child in the first session. In the second session the child produced a connected narrative based on a picturebook, comparable to the one used in the first round of interviews, and answered a number of specific questions about the story. Altogether, we recorded approximately 18 hours of spoken data during the first part of the research period, and 12 hours towards the end. Table 1 summarizes some relevant information about the children included in the study.

NAMEAGE at
Recordings
CHILD
LANG.
HOME
LANG.
SCHOOL
LANG.
1ST2ND3RD4TH
Cindy5;55;106;57;0SpanishSpanishEnglish
Daniela5;15;66;16;6SpanishSpanishEnglish/Span.
Jessica5;35;86;36;8EnglishEng./Span.English
Chris5;45;96;46;8EnglishEnglishEnglish/Span.
Michael5;55;106;67;1Eng./Span.Eng./Span.English
Bryan5;65;116;67;1Eng./SpanEng./Span.English/Span.
Melina5;116;46;107;3Eng./SpanEng./Span.English/Span.
Johanna5;76;06;77;2Eng./SpanSpanishEnglish/Span.

The monolingual and bilingual Spanish tapes from the first round of recordings have been computerized and most of them also edited. Data from the English-speaking children as well as the English tapes from the bilinguals have also been transcribed and computerized, but not yet edited. Funds were insufficient for the transcription of the second set of recordings. (See samples of computerized data, enclosed).

All aspects of the research in Los Angeles were planned by the three Principal Investigators from the University of Southern California (Drs. Clancy, Saltarelli, and Silva-Corvalán). The supervision and coordination of the research assistants' work was the responsibility of Prof. Silva-Corvalán.